Notes from a soggy garden

It’s been raining, a lot, a deluge that just keeps on coming. Gardeners up and down the country have been complaining, somewhat bitterly, that growth is slow, seedlings are sulking, French beans aren’t germinating and slugs are thriving; but on the other hand, the plants themselves just go about their business: growing, flowering, preparing to reproduce.

Aquilegia vulgaris

The plants in the ‘cool shades’ east-facing border seem unperturbed by the wet, if anything they are revelling in it. The aquilegias are now at their prettiest. I was given the dark purple wild ones by a neighbour in a swap (she got tomatoes from me in return), and the white one was picked up on a quick visit to the garden centre. It sports fabulous spurs, and looks good with the Ostrich or Shuttlecock ferns in the background.

Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Alba’

The aconite has begun its mysterious unfurling. The tight new buds higher up the stem look like inscrutable little aliens, while the opened petals bring to mind their common name, Monk’s hood, although I like to think of them as deadly cloaked assassins, fleeing from the scene of their unspeakable crime. Aconite is a highly poisonous plant, so this role of assassin suits them.

Aconitum napellus ‘Spark’s variety’

Another dusky plant, Geranium phaeum ‘Springtime’ is a quiet character in the border, but its satin sheen gives it grace and allure, and this variety also has striking white and green marbled foliage.

Geranium phaeum ‘Springtime’

Alchemilla mollis is at its best when bejewelled by rain drops, although at this point only a couple remained. It’s growing at an astonishing rate daily, and threatens to engulf its neighbours. The frothy lime flowers will be out soon to make lovely contrasts.

Geraniums don’t mind the rain either. Many of them are just getting into their flowering.

G. himalayense ‘Gravetye’

So hard to pick a favourite geranium, but I love G. himalayense ‘Gravetye’, which has lovely large cup-shaped petals with violet veins and black stamens. There’s a Geum, ‘Scarlet Tempest’, upping the tempo in the background. Both are in dappled shade at the top end of the front path.

Further down the path, a clump of chives is in full bud – I love this stage – with some chamomile also coming into flower.

And while we might bemoan the rain, don’t these glistening drops add magic to the buds of oriental poppies, which remind me so much of dinosaur eggs that I expect pterodactyls to hatch out any day now. Even in the humble veg patch, the rain adds a touch of magic to the flowers of peas, this one is ‘Douce de Provence’.

To top it all off, the first rose to open up in the garden: what a moment, I feel a glass of Prosecco is in order! This one is a lovely botanical rose, single flowers of soft primrose yellow, and interesting almost fern-like foliage. It’s Rosa¬†x¬†cantabrigiensis, a rose developed in Cambridge botanic gardens in the 1930’s.

Rosa x cantabrigiensis

So really one feels much better after a tour of the garden, to see things alive and well, by and large, in their soggy domain.

Six on Saturday: 26 Dec 2020

I thought I would give today’s Six on Saturday a miss, but the sun is shining, and after the torpor of yesterday’s Christmas lunch, I felt invigorated by an early morning Boxing Day bike ride, so here I am. I hope everyone had a pleasant Christmas day and is feeling hopeful for the new year ahead.

1 Rainbow. Hope is the theme of my first photo, taken on Christmas day, of our habitual view of the flanks of the forest. Surely a sign of better things to come?

2 Spanish bluebells. More hopeful signs on the ground. First sightings of the bluebells poking through. I know a lot of people have taken against Spanish bluebells, with some British gardeners seeing them as an invasive non-native species, which I think is a little unfair and disproportionate. They behave themselves pretty well in the garden, and haven’t colonised any other areas.

3 Fuschia magellanica seeds. The transformation from flowers to seeds took me by surprise this year. The others are all still in flower.

4 Chamomile. Lovely to see how well this has self-seeded itself along the front path. I will be making tea with this bunch in the summer, all being well.

5 Rosemary. Something has been nibbling away at it, and here is the culprit. I seem to have a lot of these rosemary beetles this year, and this unfortunate creature and accompanying grubs have been put on the bird feeder. This mild winter seems to suit them.

6 Snapdragons. I really wasn’t expecting these to still be in flower after Christmas! Perhaps it will pull through the winter? My garden is pretty sheltered by trees and brick walls, and you can see in the second photo that this little bed still looks decent. Apart from the ferns, not a lot has died back, the herbs are all fine and the Heucheras are happy here.

That’s all for this week, I’ll be back for a New Year Six on Saturday. There are still dedicated Six on Saturday regulars to be found on The Propagator’s blog, and they all go to show that there’s still plenty going on the garden, you just need to look.

Wishing you all a happy, healthy and more hopeful year in 2021, and thank you for reading!